22.12.2015

ENISA: Three studies on PbD, PETs and Cyber Security

  • ENISA, Privacy by design in big data: An overview of privacy enhancing technologies in the era of big data analytics (pdf): The extensive collection and further processing of personal information in the context of big data analytics has given rise to serious privacy concerns, especially relating to wide scale electronic surveillance, profiling, and disclosure of private data. In order to allow for all the benefits of analytics without invading individuals’ private sphere, it is of utmost importance to draw the limits of big data processing and integrate the appropriate data protection safeguards in the core of the analytics value chain. ENISA, with the current report, aims at supporting this approach, taking the position that, with respect to the underlying legal obligations, the challenges of technology (for big data) should be addressed by the opportunities of technology (for privacy).
  • ENISA, Online privacy tools for the general public - Towards a methodology for the evaluation of PETs for internet & mobile users (pdf); ENISA has published a study in the area of PETs for the protection of online privacy (online privacy tools) with two main objectives: a) to define the current level of information and guidance that is provided to the general public and b) to provide a proposal for an assessment model for online privacy tools that could bring more assurance in their use, supporting their wider adoption by internet and mobile users.                 
  • ENISA, Cyber Security Information Sharing: An Overview of Regulatory and Non-regulatory Approaches (pdf): This study aims to present the regulatory and non-regulatory approaches of EU Member States as well as EEA and EFTA countries to share information on cyber incidents, the different sector regulation challenges of managing cyber security issues, and their key practices in addressing them. The study identifies three types of approaches to share information on cyber security incidents: 1) traditional regulation; 2) alternative forms of regulation, such as self- and co-regulation; 3) other approaches to enable information sharing, such as information and education schemes.